Sam Nhlengethwa / Tributes / 2008

Sam Nhlengethwa / Tributes / 2008
13 September - 04 October 2008
Installation View
Sam Nhlengethwa
Senegalese Images Exhibition (Diptych), 2008
Collage, Oil And Acrylic On Canvas
159.8 x 140.3 cm (each panel)
Sam Nhlengethwa
Tribute To Dumile Feni, 2008
Lithograph
49.5 x 69 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
Tribute To William Kentridge, 2008
Lithograph
56.5 x 90.5 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
Tribute To Peter Clarke, 2008
Lithograph
49.5 x 69 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
Jozi Trip Exhibition sketch, 2008
Charcoal
37.5 x 50 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
Opening Night sketch , 2008
Charcoal
37.5 x 50 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
Tribute To Judith Mason, 2008
Lithograph
49.5 x 69 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
The Interiors Exhibitions sketch, 2008
Charcoal
37.5 x 50 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
Tribute to David Koloane, 2008
Lithograph
56.5 x 74.5 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
Mine Trip Exhibition (Diptych), 2008
Collage, Oil And Acrylic On Canvas
159.7 x 140 cm (each panel)
Sam Nhlengethwa
Retrospect I (Triptych) , 2008
Collage, Oil And Acrylic On Canvas
180 x 120.5 cm (each panel)
Sam Nhlengethwa
Senegalese Images Exhibition sketch, 2008
Charcoal
37.5 x 50 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
Mine Trip Exhibition sketch, 2008
Charcoal
37.5 x 50 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
Opening Night: Jazz (Diptych), 2008
Collage, Oil And Acrylic On Canvas
180 x 159.5 cm
Sam Nhlengethwa
Tribute To Marlene Dumas, 2008
Lithograph
49.5 x 69 cm

Sam Nhlengethwa / Tributes / 2008 - Installation View

13 September - 04 October 2008

Sam Nhlengethwa

Senegalese Images Exhibition (Diptych)

Sam Nhlengethwa

Tribute To Dumile Feni

Sam Nhlengethwa

Tribute To William Kentridge

Sam Nhlengethwa

Tribute To Peter Clarke

Sam Nhlengethwa

Jozi Trip Exhibition sketch

Sam Nhlengethwa

Opening Night sketch

Sam Nhlengethwa

Tribute To Judith Mason

Sam Nhlengethwa

The Interiors Exhibitions sketch

Sam Nhlengethwa

Tribute to David Koloane

Sam Nhlengethwa

Mine Trip Exhibition (Diptych)

Sam Nhlengethwa

Retrospect I (Triptych)

Sam Nhlengethwa

Senegalese Images Exhibition sketch

Sam Nhlengethwa

Mine Trip Exhibition sketch

Sam Nhlengethwa

Opening Night: Jazz (Diptych)

Sam Nhlengethwa

Tribute To Marlene Dumas

Sam Nhlengethwa explores a range of themes that encompass everyday urban life both in South Africa and elsewhere on the continent. Alternately sombre or playful, his works may focus on serious social, political and cultural commentary or on the sheer enjoyment of life. As a devotee of jazz, Nhlengethwa draws much of his inspiration from music, which features prominently throughout an oeuvre noted for its strong sense of design, syncopated rhythm and luminosity of colour. Nhlengethwa was Standard Bank Young Artists Award Winner in 1994.

For this exhibition Sam Nhlengethwa brings together his signature combination of collage and paint media to create impressive, large scale works that reflect on the social processes of art. Themed around opening nights, he makes tongue-in-cheek reference to the art world in arcane and witty fashion. The artist also continues his lithographic series of Tributes in which he pays homage to South Africa’s most illustrious artists such as Dumile Feni, David Koloane and Marlene Dumas.

Sam Nhlengethwa

Sam Nhlengethwa was born in the mining community of Payneville Springs in 1955 and grew up in Ratanda location in Heidelberg, east of Johannesburg. He completed a two-year Fine Art Diploma at the Rorkes Drift Art Centre in the late 1970s. While he exhibited extensively both locally and abroad during the 1980s and ’90s, Nhlengethwa’s travelling solo show South Africa, Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow in 1993 established him at the vanguard of critical consciousness in South Africa and he went on to win the Standard Bank Young Artist Award in 1994.

Nhlengethwa was born into a family of jazz lovers; his two brothers both collected jazz music and his deceased eldest brother was a jazz musician. “Painting jazz pieces is an avenue or outlet for expressing my love for the music,” he once said in an interview. "As I paint, I listen to jazz and visualise the performance. Jazz performers improvise within the conventions of their chosen styles. In an ensemble, for example, there are vocal styles that include freedom of vocal colour, call-and-response patterns and rhythmic complexities played by different members. Painting jazz allows me to literally put colour onto these vocal colours.

“Jazz is rhythmic and it emphasises interpretation rather than composition. There are deliberate tonal distortions that contribute to its uniqueness. My jazz collages, with their distorted patterns, attempt to communicate all of this. As a collagist and painter, fortunately, the technique allows me this freedom of expression… What I am doing is not new though, as there are other artists before me who painted jazz pieces. For example, Gerard Sekoto, Romare Bearden and Henri Matisse.”

Nhlengethwa’s work has been included in key exhibitions such as Seven Stories About Modern Art in Africa at the Whitechapel Gallery in London and major publications such as Phaidon’s The 20th Century Art Book. He has had several solo shows in South Africa and abroad, exhibiting in the 12th International Cairo Biennale (2010) and in Constructions: Contemporary Art from South Africa at Museu de Arte Contemporanea de Niteroi (2011) in Brazil. In 2018 Nhlengethwa was included on the group exhibition Beyond Borders: Global Africa at the University of Michigan Museum of Art.