Speaking Back | Curated by Natasha Becker / 2015

Speaking Back | Curated by Natasha Becker / 2015
23 May - 18 July 2015
Installation View
Virginia Chihota
The root of the flower we do not know (mudzi weruva ratisingazive), 2014
Screenprint on paper
Image: 120 x 80 cm Frame: 134 x 93 cm
Adejoke Tugbiyele
Exit Only, no Entry, 2014
Archival sepia ink on archival acetate
Image: 43 x 35.5cm Frame: 49.5 x 41 cm
Adejoke Tugbiyele
Unpray the Flesh, 2013
Rubber dildo and skull beads
84 x 30 x 9cm
Nkiru Oparah
Poetics of reverie, 2014
Video in framed monitor

Tracey Rose
The Black Paintings: Dead White Man, 2012
Single HD colour projection with stereo audio speakers

Candice Breitz
Factum: Tremblay, 2009
2 Hard Drives
78 minutes, 8 seconds
Adejoke Tugbiyele
Reward for Sin is Death , 2014
Archival sepia ink on archival acetate
Image: 43 x 35.5cm Frame: 49.5 x 41 cm
Arlene Wandera
I've Always Wanted a Doll's House, 2013-2014
Mixed medium
Variable
Ellen Gallagher
Odalisque, 2005
Site installation: slide projection and gold leaf
Dimensions variable
Nkiru Oparah
study n°092314 descent into ashes: revisiting the katabasis phenomenon, 2014
Video in framed monitor

ruby onyinyechi amanze
with the galaxy beneath her, she remembered the magic of soaring amidst coconut clouds, 2014
Pencil, ink, photo transfers
203 x 266 cm
Adejoke Tugbiyele
Barack Obama, Back Off, 2014
Archival sepia ink on archival acetate
Image: 35.5 x 43 cm Frame: 41 x 49.5cm
Virginia Chihota
The root of the flower we do not know (mudzi weruva ratisingazive), 2014
Screenprint on paper
Image: 120 x 80cm Frame: 134 x 93 cm
Adejoke Tugbiyele
Death by Stoning, 2014
Archival sepia ink on archival acetate
Image: 43 x 35.5cm Frame: 49.5 x 41 cm
Adejoke Tugbiyele
We Support Our Parliament, Uganda, 2014
Archival sepia ink on archival acetate
Image: 43 x 35.5cm Frame: 49.5 x 41 cm
ruby onyinyechi amanze
Chasing relentlessly after fading things - The Birth of BLACK, audre marries its indigenous self - Shadows validate existence (ada and Twin find ground), 2014
Pencil, ink, pens, photo transfers, collage
203 x 528.5 cm
Adejoke Tugbiyele
Africa Loves Obama, But... , 2014
Archival sepia ink on archival acetate
Image: 43 x 35.5cm Frame: 49.5 x 41 cm
Virginia Chihota
The root of the flower we do not know (mudzi weruva ratisingazive), 2014
Screenprint on paper
Image: 120 x 80 cm Frame: 134 x 93 cm
Adejoke Tugbiyele
Anus for Defication, 2014
Archival sepia ink on archival acetate
Image: 43 x 35.5cm Frame: 49.5 x 41 cm
Mickalene Thomas
Happy Birthday to a Beautiful Woman, 2012
Digital video
23 min 06 sec
Ghada Amer
Dreaming of Felipe-RFGA, 2010
Embroidery, acrylic and gel medium on canvas
Work: 71.1 x 80 cm
Otobong Nkanga
About No be Today Story O!,


Kara Walker
Fall From Grace, Miss Pipi's Blue Tale, 2011
Video
17 min
Adejoke Tugbiyele
Bring back the death Penalty, 2014
Archival sepia ink on archival acetate
Image: 43 x 35.5cm Frame: 49.5 x 41 cm
Adejoke Tugbiyele
As Ugly As The Devil , 2014
Archival sepia ink on archival acetate
Image: 43 x 35.5cm Frame: 49.5 x 41 cm
Adejoke Tugbiyele
Let's Unite Against Sodomy, 2014
Archival sepia ink on archival acetate
Image: 43 x 35.5cm Frame: 49.5 x 41 cm
Nkiru Oparah
In search of divine love with simple faith I find I Am Who I Am, I find my self, 2015
Video in framed monitor

Virginia Chihota
Kuna muvambi wehupenyu, 2013
Screenprint and mixed media on paper
Image: 150 x 122 cm Frame: 165 x 139 cm
Ivy Chemutai Ngok
The Climb, 2015
Oil on Canvas
250 x 148cm
Nkiru Oparah
study n°121714, projection or rejection? the anima meets resistance to inertia, 2014
Video in framed monitor

Speaking Back | Curated by Natasha Becker / 2015 - Installation View

23 May - 18 July 2015

Virginia Chihota

The root of the flower we do not know (mudzi weruva ratisingazive)

Adejoke Tugbiyele

Exit Only, no Entry

Adejoke Tugbiyele

Unpray the Flesh

Nkiru Oparah

Poetics of reverie

Tracey Rose

The Black Paintings: Dead White Man

Candice Breitz

Factum: Tremblay

Adejoke Tugbiyele

Reward for Sin is Death

Arlene Wandera

I've Always Wanted a Doll's House

Ellen Gallagher

Odalisque

Nkiru Oparah

study n°092314 descent into ashes: revisiting the katabasis phenomenon

ruby onyinyechi amanze

with the galaxy beneath her, she remembered the magic of soaring amidst coconut clouds

Adejoke Tugbiyele

Barack Obama, Back Off

Virginia Chihota

The root of the flower we do not know (mudzi weruva ratisingazive)

Adejoke Tugbiyele

Death by Stoning

Adejoke Tugbiyele

We Support Our Parliament, Uganda

ruby onyinyechi amanze

Chasing relentlessly after fading things - The Birth of BLACK, audre marries its indigenous self - Shadows validate existence (ada and Twin find ground)

Adejoke Tugbiyele

Africa Loves Obama, But...

Virginia Chihota

The root of the flower we do not know (mudzi weruva ratisingazive)

Adejoke Tugbiyele

Anus for Defication

Mickalene Thomas

Happy Birthday to a Beautiful Woman

Ghada Amer

Dreaming of Felipe-RFGA

Otobong Nkanga

About No be Today Story O!

Kara Walker

Fall From Grace, Miss Pipi's Blue Tale

Adejoke Tugbiyele

Bring back the death Penalty

Adejoke Tugbiyele

As Ugly As The Devil

Adejoke Tugbiyele

Let's Unite Against Sodomy

Nkiru Oparah

In search of divine love with simple faith I find I Am Who I Am, I find my self

Virginia Chihota

Kuna muvambi wehupenyu

Ivy Chemutai Ngok

The Climb

Nkiru Oparah

study n°121714, projection or rejection? the anima meets resistance to inertia

Goodman Gallery Cape Town
23 May – 18 July 2015

ruby onyinyechi amanze, Ghada Amer, Candice Breitz, Virginia Chihota, Ivy Chemutai Ng’ok, Otobong Nkanga, Nkiru Oparah, Tracey Rose, Adejoke Tugbiyele, Mickalene Thomas, Kara Walker, Arlene Wandera, Ellen Gallagher

Speaking Back seeks to reveal deeply significant dimensions of culture and subjectivity, history and struggle, by bringing women together as diverse artists to find out what each in her artistically signified yet gendered/racial/sexual/cultural singularity is offering to the world, to us all. It seeks to attain a more complete knowledge of that world, as it is lived, from multiple positions over time and space.

We have a tendency in exhibitions of work by women to generalise the artists as merely exemplars of a gendered collective: women, a sexualising nomination by which they are, as a category lumped together, their singularity annulled. While the exhibition makes space – conceptually and physically – for women artists, it embraces the potential of aesthetic practice to bring forward the singularity of each person and the variations in her specific symbolic capacities. If there are any generalisations to be made, it could be said that Speaking Back, prioritises narration – the use of particularly chosen aesthetic practices to convey a story to an audience. Not just as storytelling, but as speaking authentically, with vulnerability and strength, about who we are, and about the power of narration and its endless possibilities for reinvention.

Presented for the first time in South Africa, Ellen Gallagher is an acclaimed artist who, starting in the mid-1990s, has united various media with a range of subject matter to explore the place, and places, of African Americans. In Odalisque (2005), one of the artworks in the exhibition, Gallagher takes a photograph by Man Ray of Matisse, substitutes Freud’s head for that of Matisse’s and gives the model who is being drawn (and whose dress suggests that she is from that most sexualised and most sexually unequal context, the harem) the artists own face. Like the artist staring back at him from a reclining body, we confront the image of a great narrator of the universal psychic world attempting – it would appear with some awkwardness – to draw, and hence represent, an individual reality. Odalisque prompts us to consider what we can and cannot represent about others and ourselves.

In another instance, Virginia Chihota’s stunning screen prints urge us to reconsider not only the lives and strategies of individual artists but also the circumstances in which African diasporic female identity, visibility, and history have been produced and transformed. Her obsessive re-exploration of themes, such as, marriage and motherhood is transformed into a body of works that is striking in its symbolic resonance, and rife with allusions to everyday life, and religious and folkloric symbolism. In the series, root of the flower we do not know (mudzi weruva ratisingazive, 2014) our encounter with Chihota is dominated by the black female figure she insistently imagines, demonstrating a method of representing the self differently while exercising her right and desire to confirm and consolidate her identity as artist and her experience as female.

Adejoke Tugbiyele’s multimedia aesthetic practice offers a different take on sexual identity and political freedom –an issue all too familiar to South African audiences through the work of local artists and political activists. Tugbiyele is an emerging Nigerian-American artist and activist who spent her formative years growing up in Lagos, Nigeria. Her series of drawings, inspired by the journalistic fervour in Lagos during the passing of Nigeria’s anti-gay laws in 2014, draws attention to the self-righteous moralising inherent in contemporary media narratives surrounding the bill and her conceptual sculpture, Unpray the Flesh (2013) investigates religious complicity in the persecution of marginalised groups through the conjoining of religious symbolism with phallocentric worship. In AfroOdyssey V: Demons Contained, a performative video piece, Tugbiyele delves into her own sexual identifications and the narrative ramifications of ‘coming out,’ for familial and cultural histories.

New York-based artist Mickalene Thomas is best known for her elaborate paintings composed of rhinestones, acrylic and enamel which articulate complex visions of what it means to be a woman and expands stereotypical definitions of beauty. Her film about her mother, former fashion model Sandra Bush, demonstrates her ongoing engagement with portraiture as a key to personal and cultural identity. In the process of this extraordinary film, Thomas reveals the complex role of the mother-daughter bond for each woman’s sense of self. Internationally renowned, Otobong Nkanga employs traces of memory and human activity as the sounding board for narration and ‘the performative’ in her work that negotiate the cycle of art between the aesthetic realm of display and a strategies of de-sublimation that push the status of the artwork as contingency. In her artist book, No Be One Story O! (2010) Nkanga makes a radical artistic departure into the realm of literature itself. Based on a series of earlier drawings, Filtered Memories that represent select childhood and adolescent memories of the artist, the book explores the consequences of memory and, simultaneously, the defamiliarisation of the art object.

Speaking Back suggests and invites an encounter with expanded methods of cultural inquiry and the heterogeneity and creativity of contemporary art in the work of the above-mentioned artists as well as that of Ruby Onyinyechi Amanze, Ghada Amer, Candice Breitz, Tracy Rose, Ivy Chemutai Ng’ok, Nkiru Oparah, Kara Walker, and Arlene Wandera.

Kara Walker

Kara Walker was born in Stockton, California, in 1969. She studied at the Rhode Island School of Design and the Atlanta College of Art, and now lives in New York. Walker is well known for her cut-out silhouettes and films that examine, in particular, race, the history of the Antebellum South in the USA, African-American identity, and representations of black women. These tableaux offer a visual paring down of the history of Africa in America but despite their graphic simplicity they are often replete with violence and action. In an interview for the film series Art:21 Walker comments that ‘A lot of my work has been about the unexpected … wanting to be the heroine and yet wanting to kill the heroine at the same time. That kind of dilemma, that push and pull, is the underlying turbulence that I bring to each of the pieces that I make. The silhouette lends itself to avoidance of the subject, not being able to look at it directly.’

Kara Walker began exhibiting her work in 1995. She has had numerous solo exhibitions since then in galleries and museums in the US, Europe, and the Middle East, including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Tel Aviv Museum of Art, Mannheimer Kunstverein in Munich, Deutsche Guggenheim, Tate Liverpool, and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She has also participated in group exhibitions such as SITE Santa Fe, the Whitney Biennial, and the Istanbul Biennale. Her works are in many important public collections.

Ghada Amer

Ghada Amer (b. 1963, Cairo, Egypt) views herself primarily as a painter, but she has worked in a variety of media, producing ceramics, site-specific garden works, photographs, prints, drawings, installations, and performance pieces.

Her work has always explored ideas related to women, femininity, and gender roles. ‘I believe that all women should like their bodies and use them as tools of seduction,’ Amer stated; and in her well-known erotic embroideries, she at once rejects oppressive laws set in place to govern women’s attitudes toward their bodies and repudiates first-wave feminist theory that the body must be denied to prevent victimisation. By depicting explicit sexual acts with the delicacy of needle and thread, their significance assumes a tenderness absent within simple objectification. Amer continuously allows herself to explore the dichotomies of an uneasy world and confronts the language of hostility and finality with unsettled narratives of longing and love.

Amer’s work addresses first and foremost the ambiguous, transitory nature of the paradox that arises when searching for concrete definitions of east and west, feminine and masculine, art and craft. Through her paintings, sculptures and public garden projects, Amer takes traditional notions of cultural identity, abstraction, and religious fundamentalism and turns them on their heads.
She has also created a number of text-based works, most notably the installation piece Encyclopaedia of Pleasure, which comprises fifty-seven canvas boxes inscribed with embroidered texts serving as investigations of sexual and spiritual identity. While her works serve as commentary on the roles of women, they also offer a critique of painting itself, particularly in its largely masculine Abstract Expressionist mode. Her incorporation of thread into the parameters of the canvas legitimates a form of expression seen as particularly feminine.

Amer has shown her work all over the world, including the Istanbul, Johannesburg, Whitney, Gwangju, Sydney and Venice biennales; in major travelling shows such as The Short Century; Looking Both Ways: Art of the Contemporary African Diaspora; and Africa Remix. She has exhibited at P.S. 1 in New York and SITE Santa Fe, and in 2008 the Brooklyn Museum hosted Love Has no End, a retrospective of twenty years of Amer’s work.

Amer trained to be an artist at Villa Arson, Nice, France.

She currently lives and works in New York City.

Candice Breitz

Candice Breitz (b. 1972, Johannesburg, South Africa) is an artist whose moving image installations have been shown internationally. Throughout her career, she has explored the dynamics by means of which an individual becomes him or herself in relation to a larger community, be that community the immediate community that one encounters in family, or the real and imagined communities that are shaped not only by questions of national belonging, race, gender and religion, but also by the increasingly undeniable influence of mainstream media such as television, cinema and popular culture. Most recently, Breitz’s work has focused on the conditions under which empathy is produced, reflecting on a media-saturated global culture in which strong identification with fictional characters and celebrity figures runs parallel to widespread indifference to the plight of those facing real world adversity.

Solo exhibitions of Breitz’s work have been hosted by the Kunstmuseum Stuttgart, National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, Kunsthaus Bregenz, Palais de Tokyo (Paris), The Power Plant (Toronto), Louisiana Museum of Modern Art (Humlebæk), Modern Art Oxford, De Appel Foundation (Amsterdam), Baltic Centre for Contemporary Art (Gateshead), MUDAM / Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean (Luxembourg), Moderna Museet (Stockholm), Castello di Rivoli (Turin), Pinchuk Art Centre (Kyiv), Centre d’Art Contemporain Genève, Bawag Foundation (Vienna), Temporäre Kunsthalle Berlin, White Cube (London), MUSAC / Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (Spain), Wexner Center for the Arts (Ohio), O.K Center for Contemporary Art Upper Austria (Linz), ACMI / The Australian Centre for the Moving Image (Melbourne), Collection Lambert en Avignon, FACT / Foundation for Art & Creative Technology (Liverpool), Blaffer Art Museum (Houston) and the South African National Gallery (Cape Town).

Selected group exhibitions include South Africa: the art of a nation (British Museum, London, 2016), Laughing in a Foreign Language (The Hayward, London, 2008), The Cinema Effect (Hirshhorn Museum + Sculpture Garden, Washington, D.C., 2008), Made in Germany (Kunstverein Hannover, 2007), Superstars (Kunsthalle Wien, 2005), CUT: Film as Found Object (Museum of Contemporary Art, North Miami, 2004), Continuity + Transgression (National Museum of Modern Art, Tokyo, 2002), Thank You for the Music (Kiasma Museum of Modern Art, Helsinki, 2012), Rollenbilder – Rollenspiele (Museum der Moderne Salzburg, 2011), Performa (New York, 2009), Contemporary Outlook: Seeing Songs (Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, 2009), Remix: Contemporary Art and Pop (Tate Liverpool, 2002) and Looking at You (Museum Fridericianum, Kassel, 2001).

Breitz has participated in biennales in Johannesburg (1997), São Paulo (1998), Istanbul (1999), Taipei (2000), Kwangju (2000), Tirana (2001), Venice (2005, 2017), New Orleans (2008), Göteborg (2003 + 2009), Singapore (2011) and Dakar (2014). Her work has been featured at the Sundance Film Festival (New Frontier, 2009) and the Toronto International Film Festival (David Cronenberg: Transformation, 2013).

Her work has been acquired by museums including the Museum of Modern Art,the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Jewish Museum (in New York), Louisiana Museum of Modern Art (Humlebæk), San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the National Gallery of Canada (Ottawa), Städtische Galerie im Lenbachhaus (Munich), Art Gallery of Ontario (Toronto), FNAC / Fonds national d’art contemporain (France), Castello di Rivoli (Turin), Hamburger Kunsthalle (Hamburg), M+ / Museum of Visual Culture (Hong Kong), Milwaukee Art Museum, Kunstmuseum St. Gallen, MUDAM / Musée d’Art Moderne Grand-Duc Jean (Luxembourg), MUSAC / Museo de Arte Contemporáneo de Castilla y León (León, Spain), Kunstmuseum Lichtenstein (Vaduz), MONA / Museum of Old and New Art (Tasmania), QAG GOMA / Queensland Art Gallery (Brisbane), Museum of Fine Arts (Boston) and MAXXI / Museo nazionale delle arti del XXI secolo (Rome).

Breitz holds degrees from the University of the Witwatersrand (Johannesburg), the University of Chicago and Columbia University (NYC). She has participated in the Whitney Museum’s Independent Studio Program and led the Palais de Tokyo’s Le Pavillon residency as a visiting artist during the year 2005-2006. She has been a tenured professor at the Hochschule für Bildende Künste in Braunschweig since 2007.

Candice Breitz lives and works between Cape Town, South Africa and Berlin, Germany.

Recent work can be viewed at: http://vimeo.com/album/259786

Tracey Rose

Born in Durban, South Africa, in 1974
Lives and works in Durban

ruby onyinyechi amanze

ruby onyinyechi amanze (b. 1982, Port-Harcourt, Nigeria) is a Brooklyn-based artist of Nigerian descent and British upbringing whose creative practices and processes focus on producing mixed media, paper-based drawings and works. Her art draws inspiration from photography, textiles, architecture and print-making.

In her approach to art, amanze’s body of work establishes an introspective dialogue and personal quest in an attempt to materialise her experience of displacement and dislocation. The motifs and symbols of amanze’s works create non-linear narratives which articulate and delve into ideas surrounding free play as an act of revolution and post-colonial, non-nationalism as an accepted norm in western societies.

Most recently, amanze completed two-year long residencies at the Queens Museum and as part of the Drawing Center’s Open Sessions Program, both in New York. She has exhibited her work internationally in Lagos, London, Johannesburg and Paris, and nationally at the California African American Museum, the Drawing Center and the Studio Museum of Harlem. In 2019, amanze was named the Deutsche Bank Featured Artist at Frieze New York.

amanze relocated to the United States to study a Bachelor of Fine Art degree at the Tyler School of Art at Temple University in Philadelphia. She graduated summa cum laude and continued her academic career obtaining a Masters degree in Fine Art from the Cranbrook Academy of Art in Michigan. Recognised for her academic excellence, in 2012-2013, amanze was the recipient of the prestigious Fulbright Scholars award and was hosted by the University of Nigeria, Nsukka.

amanze currently resides between Philadelphia and Brooklyn, but calls multiple places home.