Frieze London 2019
03 October - 06 October 2019
Installation View
William Kentridge
Untitled (Almost Don't Tremble), 2019
Indian ink on found pages

William Kentridge
Untitled (Lacking the Courage of the Bonfire), 2019
Indian ink on found pages

William Kentridge
Cat, 2019
Bronze

William Kentridge
Drawing from Waiting for the Sybil (Trees I), 2019
Indian ink on found paper

William Kentridge
Cape Silver (Medium Scale), 2018
Bronze

William Kentridge
Carrier Pigeon, 2019
Bronze

William Kentridge
Shadow Figure IV, 2016
Bronze, oil paint
70 x 100 x 60cm
Kapwani Kiwanga
PEEL (black and white), 2019
shade cloth, steel, epoxy paint

Kapwani Kiwanga
TWIST (red and black), 2019
Shade cloth, steel, epoxy paint

Kapwani Kiwanga
Desire Paths: District Six , 2017
Printed cotton fabric and steel mesh

Kapwani Kiwanga
Desire Paths: Langa, 2017


Misheck Masamvu
Pinky Scratch , 2018
Oil on canvas

Misheck Masamvu
Trophies and Sycophants, 2019
Oil on Canvas

Misheck Masamvu
Straight Street, 2019
Oil on canvas

Misheck Masamvu
Vested Interests, 2019
Oil on canvas

Misheck Masamvu
Uninterrupted, 2019
Oil on canvas

Misheck Masamvu
Misheck we miss you love from dead mother and twin sister, 2017
Stained wood carving
Work: 187 x 50 x 2 cm
Misheck Masamvu
Correct Mistake , 2017
wood, canvas and oil paint
Work: 167 x 54 x 2 cm
Yinka Shonibare CBE
Clementia, 2018
Fibreglass sculpture, hand-painted with Batik pattern, and steelbase plate or plinth
Figure: 143.5 x 81 x 53 cm Plinth: 70 x 90 x 70 cm
Yinka Shonibare CBE
Diadumenos , 2019
Fibreglass sculpture, hand-painted with Dutch wax pattern, bespoke hand-coloured globe and steel baseplate

Yinka Shonibare CBE
Athena (after Myron), 2019
Fibreglass sculpture, hand-painted with Batik pattern, and steelbase plate or plinth

Grada Kilomba
The Desire Project, 2016
Three-channel video projection HD in black and white, in loop, with one sound channel, two printed impressions, and a shrine installation.
Language: Each channel has two versions of the same video, one in English and the second in Portuguese (to present at Portuguese speaking contexts only), 3 channels x 2 videos, a total of 6 videos.
Tabita Rezaire
Sorry For Real _Sorrow For _Heart, 2015
Lightbox
: 180 x 100 cm
Tabita Rezaire
Sorry For Real _Sorrow For _Truth, 2014
Lightbox
: 180 x 100 cm
Tabita Rezaire
Sorry For Real _Sorrow For _Land, 2015
Lightbox
: 180 x 100 cm
Sue Williamson
The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Couch), 1981
Archival print on cotton rag

Sue Williamson
The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Children), 1981
Archival print on cotton rag

Sue Williamson
The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Demolished), 1981
Archival print on cotton rag

Sue Williamson
The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Friend), 1981
Archival print on cotton rag

Sue Williamson
The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Naz), 1981
Archival print on cotton rag

Sue Williamson
The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Naz Head), 1981
Archival print on cotton rag

Sue Williamson
The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Naz House), 1981
Archival print on cotton rag

Sue Williamson
The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Truth), 1981
Archival print on cotton rag

Sue Williamson
A Few South Africans - Mamphela Ramphele, 1985
photo etching, screenprint, collage on paper

Sue Williamson
A Few South Africans: Amina Cachalia, 1984
Photo etching/screenprint collage
70 x 64cm
Sue Williamson
A Few South Africans - Virgina Mngoma, 1984
Photo etching and screenprint collage

Sue Williamson
Truth Games: Linda Biehl - understand the context - Mongezi Manqina, 1998
Laminated colour laser prints, wood, metal, plastic, perspex

Sue Williamson
Truth Games: Joyce Seipei - as a mother - Winnie Madikizela-Mandela, 1998
Laminated colour laser prints, wood, metal, plastic, perspex

Sue Williamson
Truth Games: Melanie Magmoed – brother shot – Dolf Vermeulen, 1998
Colour laser prints, wood, metal, plastic, Perspex

Sue Williamson
Truth Games: Joyce Mtimkulu – to ash – Col. Nic van Rernsburg, 1998
Colour laser prints, wood, metal, plastic, perspex

Frieze London 2019 - Installation View

03 October - 06 October 2019

William Kentridge

Untitled (Almost Don't Tremble)

William Kentridge

Untitled (Lacking the Courage of the Bonfire)

William Kentridge

Cat

William Kentridge

Drawing from Waiting for the Sybil (Trees I)

William Kentridge

Cape Silver (Medium Scale)

William Kentridge

Carrier Pigeon

William Kentridge

Shadow Figure IV

Kapwani Kiwanga

PEEL (black and white)

Kapwani Kiwanga

TWIST (red and black)

Kapwani Kiwanga

Desire Paths: District Six

Kapwani Kiwanga

Desire Paths: Langa

Misheck Masamvu

Pinky Scratch

Misheck Masamvu

Trophies and Sycophants

Misheck Masamvu

Straight Street

Misheck Masamvu

Vested Interests

Misheck Masamvu

Uninterrupted

Misheck Masamvu

Misheck we miss you love from dead mother and twin sister

Misheck Masamvu

Correct Mistake

Yinka Shonibare CBE

Clementia

Yinka Shonibare CBE

Diadumenos

Yinka Shonibare CBE

Athena (after Myron)

Grada Kilomba

The Desire Project

Tabita Rezaire

Sorry For Real _Sorrow For _Heart

Tabita Rezaire

Sorry For Real _Sorrow For _Truth

Tabita Rezaire

Sorry For Real _Sorrow For _Land

Sue Williamson

The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Couch)

Sue Williamson

The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Children)

Sue Williamson

The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Demolished)

Sue Williamson

The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Friend)

Sue Williamson

The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Naz)

Sue Williamson

The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Naz Head)

Sue Williamson

The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Naz House)

Sue Williamson

The Last Supper, Manley Villa (Truth)

Sue Williamson

A Few South Africans - Mamphela Ramphele

Sue Williamson

A Few South Africans: Amina Cachalia

Sue Williamson

A Few South Africans - Virgina Mngoma

Sue Williamson

Truth Games: Linda Biehl - understand the context - Mongezi Manqina

Sue Williamson

Truth Games: Joyce Seipei - as a mother - Winnie Madikizela-Mandela

Sue Williamson

Truth Games: Melanie Magmoed – brother shot – Dolf Vermeulen

Sue Williamson

Truth Games: Joyce Mtimkulu – to ash – Col. Nic van Rernsburg

Tabita Rezaire

Tabita Rezaire (b.1989, Paris, France) is a French-born Guyanese/Danish new media artist, intersectional preacher, health practitioner, tech-politics researcher and Kemetic/Kundalini Yoga teacher based in Guyana.

Rezaire’s practice explores decolonial healing through the politics of technology. Navigating architectures of power – online and offline – her works tackle the pervasive matrix of coloniality and its effects on identity, technology, sexuality, health and spirituality. Disseminating light, her digital healing activism offers substitute readings decentering occidental authority, hoping to assist in the ‘dismantling [of] our white-supremacist-patriarchal-cis-hetero-globalized world screen’, according to Rezaire.

Rezaire is also a founding member of NTU, half of the duo Malaxa, and mother of the energy house SENEB.

Artsy declared her among the 10 International Black artists to watch in 2016, and True Africa among the top 100 innovators and opinion makers on the continent in 2015. Rezaire has shown her work internationally at the Berlin Biennale, Tate Modern London, Museum of Modern Art Paris, MoCADA NY, The Broad LA, and Serpentine Gallery in London. Rezaire has presented her work on numerous panels, including Het Nieuwe Institut Rotterdam, Royal Academy The Hague, Kunsthalle Bern, National Gallery Harare, Cairotronica, Fakugezi Digital Art Africa Johannesburg. She has curated screenings at the Institute of Contemporary Art London, led technology and ‘booty politics’ workshops worldwide, conducted at yoga session at Museum of Modern Art in New York and has her writings published by Cambridge Scholars.

Rezaire holds a Bachelor in Economics (Paris) and a Master in Artist Moving Image from Central Saint Martins College (London).

Sue Williamson

Sue Williamson (b. 1941, Lichfield, UK) emigrated with her family to South Africa in 1948. Trained as a printmaker, Williamson also works in installation, photography and video. In the 1970s, she started to make work which addressed social change during apartheid and by the 1980s Williamson was well known for her series of portraits of women involved in the country’s political struggle. A Few South Africans is one such a series where she celebrates women who had played roles in the fight for freedom.

Referring to her practice, Williamson states: “You become aware of the audience to whom you speak. In that sense, you think backwards: what you have to say, whom you say it to, and how it will reach the audience. Having to consider your work through the eyes of somebody who knows nothing about you as an artist and what you are doing is a useful exercise.” Williamson has managed to avoid the rut of being caught in an apartheid-era aesthetic, “I am never particularly interested in doing what I did the last time. I take one thing and work it out a number of ways.”

In 2018, Williamson was Goodman Gallery’s featured artist at the FNB Joburg Art Fair, where she exhibited her work Messages from the Atlantic Passage, a large-scale installation of shackled, suspended glass bottles engraved with profiles of 19th-century victims of slavery. This installation was also exhibited that year at Art Basel in Switzerland and at the Kochi-Muziris Biennale in India.

Williamson’s works feature in numerous public collections across the globe, including those at the Museum of Modern Art, New York, USA, Tate Modern, London, UK, Victoria & Albert Museum, London, UK, National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA, Wifredo Lam Centre, Havana, Cuba, Iziko South African National Gallery, Cape Town, South Africa, and Johannesburg Art Gallery, South Africa.

Williamson has received various awards and fellowships such as the Bellagio Creative Arts Fellowship 2011, Italy, Rockefeller Foundation, the Visual Artist Research Award Fellowship 2007, Smithsonian Institution, Washington D.C., USA and the Lucas Artists Residency Fellowship 2005, Montalvo Art Center, California, USA.

Sue Williamson lives and works in Cape Town, South Africa.

Ghada Amer

Ghada Amer (b. 1963, Cairo, Egypt) views herself primarily as a painter, but she has worked in a variety of media, producing ceramics, site-specific garden works, photographs, prints, drawings, installations, and performance pieces.

Her work has always explored ideas related to women, femininity, and gender roles. ‘I believe that all women should like their bodies and use them as tools of seduction,’ Amer stated; and in her well-known erotic embroideries, she at once rejects oppressive laws set in place to govern women’s attitudes toward their bodies and repudiates first-wave feminist theory that the body must be denied to prevent victimisation. By depicting explicit sexual acts with the delicacy of needle and thread, their significance assumes a tenderness absent within simple objectification. Amer continuously allows herself to explore the dichotomies of an uneasy world and confronts the language of hostility and finality with unsettled narratives of longing and love.

Amer’s work addresses first and foremost the ambiguous, transitory nature of the paradox that arises when searching for concrete definitions of east and west, feminine and masculine, art and craft. Through her paintings, sculptures and public garden projects, Amer takes traditional notions of cultural identity, abstraction, and religious fundamentalism and turns them on their heads.
She has also created a number of text-based works, most notably the installation piece Encyclopaedia of Pleasure, which comprises fifty-seven canvas boxes inscribed with embroidered texts serving as investigations of sexual and spiritual identity. While her works serve as commentary on the roles of women, they also offer a critique of painting itself, particularly in its largely masculine Abstract Expressionist mode. Her incorporation of thread into the parameters of the canvas legitimates a form of expression seen as particularly feminine.

Amer has shown her work all over the world, including the Istanbul, Johannesburg, Whitney, Gwangju, Sydney and Venice biennales; in major travelling shows such as The Short Century; Looking Both Ways: Art of the Contemporary African Diaspora; and Africa Remix. She has exhibited at P.S. 1 in New York and SITE Santa Fe, and in 2008 the Brooklyn Museum hosted Love Has no End, a retrospective of twenty years of Amer’s work.

Amer trained to be an artist at Villa Arson, Nice, France.

She currently lives and works in New York City.

Kapwani Kiwanga

Kapwani Kiwanga studied anthropology and comparative religion at McGill University (Montreal, CA). She has followed the program “La Seine” at the Ecole Nationale Supérieure des Beaux-Arts de Paris, and also works at Le Fresnoy (a french national center for contemporary art). She was artist in residence at the MU Foundation in Eindhoven (NL) and at the Box in Bourges (FR).

Working with sound, film, performance, and objects, Kapwani Kiwanga relies on extensive research to transform raw information into investigations of historical narratives and their impact on political, social, and community formation. The Paris-based artist’s work focuses on sites specific to Africa and the African diaspora, examining how certain events expand and unfold into popular and folk narratives, and revealing how these stories take shape in objects and oral histories. Trained as an anthropologist, Kiwanga performs this role in her artistic practice, using historical information to construct narratives about groups of people. Kiwanga is not only invested in the past but also the future, telling Afrofuturist stories and creating speculative dossiers from future civilizations to reflect on the impact of historical events.

Yinka Shonibare CBE

Yinka Shonibare CBE (b. London, UK, 1962 -) moved to Lagos, Nigeria at the age of three. He returned to the UK to study Fine Art at Byam Shaw School of Art, London and Goldsmiths College, London, where he received his Masters in Fine Art.

He has become known for his exploration of colonialism and post-colonialism within the context of globalization. Through his interdisciplinary practice, Shonibare’s work examines race, class and the construction of cultural identity through a political commentary of the interrelationship between Africa and Europe, and their respective economic and political histories. Shonibare uses citations of Western art history and literature to question the validity of contemporary cultural and national identities.

In 2002, he was commissioned to create one of his most recognised installations, Gallantry and Criminal Conversation for Documenta XI. In 2004, he was nominated for the Turner Prize and in 2008, his mid-career survey began at Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney; touring to the Brooklyn Museum, New York and the Museum of African Art at the Smithsonian Institute, Washington D.C. In 2010, his first public art commission Nelson’s Ship in a Bottle was displayed on the Fourth Plinth in Trafalgar Square, London, and was acquired by the National Maritime Museum, Greenwich, London.

In 2013, he was elected as a Royal Academician and in 2017, Wind Sculpture VI was featured in the courtyard of the Royal Academy of the Arts, London as part of the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition. Shonibare was also commissioned by the Yale Center for British Art to create Mrs Pinckney and the Emancipated Birds of South Carolina for inclusion in ’Enlightened Princesses: Caroline, Augusta, Charlotte, and the Shaping of the Modern World’, which went on display at Kensington Palace, London in 2017.

His recent commission with the Public Art Fund, Wind Sculpture (SG) I, is now on permanent display at Davidson College, North Carolina.

He was awarded the honour of ‘Commander of the Order of the British Empire’ in the 2019 New Year’s Honours List.

His work is included in notable museum collections including Tate, London; the National Museum of African Art, Smithsonian Institute, Washington D.C.; Museum of Modern Art, New York; Guggenheim Abu Dhabi; Moderna Museet, Stockholm and the Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago among others.

Misheck Masamvu

Part of Zimbabwe’s ‘born-free generation’, Misheck Masamvu (b. 1980 in Penhalonga, Zimbabwe) explores and comments on the socio-political setting of post-independence Zimbabwe, and draws attention to the impact of economic policies that sustain political mayhem. Masamvu raises questions and ideas around the state of ‘being’ and the preservation of dignity. His practice encompasses drawing, painting and sculpture.

Misheck Masamvu studied at Atelier Delta and Kunste Akademie in Munich, where he initially specialised in the realist style, and later developed a more avant-garde expressionist mode of representation with dramatic and graphic brushstrokes. His work deliberately uses this expressionist depiction, in conjunction with controversial subject matter, to push his audience to levels of visceral discomfort with the purpose of accurately capturing the plight, political turmoil and concerns of his Zimbabwean subjects and their experiences. His works serve as a reminder that the artist is constantly socially-engaged and is tasked with being a voice to give shape and form to a humane sociological topography. Masamvu will be taking part in the 22nd Biennale of Sydney in 2020.

Masamvu’s work has been well-received and exhibited in numerous shows including Armory Show 2018, Art Basel 2018, Basel Miami Beach 2017, 1-54 Contemporary African Art Fair New York 2016, São Paulo Biennale 2016, and the Venice Biennale, Zimbabwe Pavillion 2011.

William Kentridge

William Kentridge’s work has been seen in museums and galleries around the world since the 1990s, including Documenta in Kassel, Germany (1997, 2003, 2012), the Museum of Modern Art in New York (1998, 2010), the Albertina Museum in Vienna (2010), Jeu de Paume in Paris (2010), and the Musée du Louvre in Paris (2010), where he presented Carnets d’Egypte, a project conceived especially for the Egyptian Room. Kentridge’s production of Mozart’s The Magic Flute was presented at Theatre de la Monnaie in Brussels, Festival d’Aix, and in 2011 at La Scala in Milan, and his production of Shostakovich’s The Nose was seen at The New York Metropolitan Opera in 2010 and again in 2013, travelling to Festival d’Aix and to Lyon in 2011. The five-channel video and sound installation The Refusal of Time was made for Documenta (13) in Kassel, Germany, in 2012; since then it has been seen at MAXXI in Rome, the Metropolitan Museum, New York, and other cities including Boston, Perth, Kyoto, Helsinki and Wellington. A substantial survey exhibition of Kentridge’s work opened in Rio de Janeiro in 2012, going on in following years to Porto Alegre, São Paulo, Bogota, Medellin, and Mexico City. In the summer of 2014 Kentridge’s production of Schubert’s Winterreise opened at the Vienna Festival, Festival d’Aix, and Holland Festival. In the fall it opened at the Lincoln Center in New York. Paper Music, a concert of projections with live music by Philip Miller, opened in Florence in September 2014, and was presented at Carnegie Hall in New York in late October 2014. Both the installation The Refusal of Time and its companion performance piece Refuse the Hour were presented in Cape Town in February 2015. More recently, Kentridge’s production of the Alban Berg opera Wozzeck premiered at the Salzburg Festival in 2017, and last year his acclaimed performance project The Head & The Load opened at Tate Modern in London, and travelled to Park Avenue Armory in December 2018. In June 2019, A Poem That I Used To Know opened at Kunstmuseum, Basel in Switzerland. This comprehensive survey show includes early drawings, major film installations, sculpture and two new pieces, an installation and a film, produced by Kentridge in response to works in the museum’s permanent collection.

In 2010, Kentridge received the prestigious Kyoto Prize in recognition of his contributions in the field of arts and philosophy. In 2011, he was elected as an Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and received the degree of Doctor of Literature honoris causa from the University of London. In 2012, Kentridge presented the Charles Eliot Norton Lectures at Harvard University and was elected member of the American Philosophical Society and of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences. Also in that year, he was awarded the Dan David Prize by Tel Aviv University, and was named as Commandeur des Arts et Lettres by the French Ministry of Culture and Communication. In 2013, William Kentridge was awarded an Honorary Doctorate in Fine Arts by Yale University and in 2014 received an Honorary Doctorate from the University of Cape Town.

Upcoming News and Projects

Why Should I Hesitate, a major survey show, divided across the Norval Foundation and Zetiz MOCAA, is to opened in late August 2019 and will run until March 2020. Kentridge’s new opera project, Waiting for the Sibyl, will premiere at Teatro dell’Opera di Roma in September 2019. Waiting for the Sibyl was created in response to Alexander Calder’s Work in Progress, the only operatic work created by Calder and staged at the Opera in Rome in 1968. These two works will be performed consecutively at the Teatro Costanzi as the joint presentation, Calder/Kentridge. Performances will take place from 10 – 15 September, 2019.

Grada Kilomba

Grada Kilomba (b. 1968, Lisbon, Portugal) is an interdisciplinary artist and writer born in Lisbon and living in Berlin. Kilomba’s work draws on the repressed history of colonialism and its legacy on memory, trauma, race, gender, and knowledge production: ‘who can speak?’ ‘what can we speak about?’ and ‘ What happens when we speak?’ are three constant questions in Kilomba ’s body of work.

Kilomba is best known for her subversive writing and her unconventional use of artistic practices, in which she gives body, voice and image to her own text, using a variety of formats such as Staged Reading, Performance, and Video Installation. In her work, Kilomba intentionally creates a hybrid space between the academic and the artistic languages, and uses storytelling as a central element for her decolonial practices.

Kilomba‘s work has been described to have the powerful beauty of touching ‘the colonial wound’ with a surgical precision, ’bringing a new, experimental and compelling voice to contemporary art and discourse’ (ARTE Brasileiros 2016). She decolonises by subverting content, undoing standard practices and inventing new methods and places of expression. Kilomba entered the contemporary art world, in 2016, when she was invited and commissioned to develop a artwork for the 32. Bienal de São Paulo.

Kilomba’s work has been presented internationally, including: 10. Berlin Biennale; Documenta 14, Kassel; 32. Bienal de São Paulo; Rauma Biennale Balticum; The Power Plant, Toronto; MAAT Museum of Art, Architecture and Technology, Lisbon; Galeria Avenida da Índia, Lisbon; WdW Center for Contemporary Art, Rotterdam; Secession Museum, Vienna; Bozar Museum,Brussels; SAVVY Contemporary, Berlin; Maxim Gorki Theatre, Berlin, among others. Her written work has been published in numerous international anthologies and translated into several languages. She is the author of Plantation Memories (2008) a compilation of episodes of everyday racism written in the form of short psychoanalytical stories, and released at the International Literature Festival, Berlin. And the co-editor of Mythen, Subjekt und Masken (2008), a pioneer anthology on Critical Whiteness.

In 2010, as part of her „Performing Knowledge“ project, Kilomba started experimenting with the performance of theoretical and political texts on stage. Particularly acclaimed became her staged reading „Plantation Memories“ (2012) based on her own book; and her lecture-performance "Decolonising Knowledge“ (2013), a piece reflecting on the concepts of knowledge, race, gender, and violence: “ What is acknowledged as knowledge? And what is not? Whose knowledge is this? And who is acknowledged to produce knowledge?” She was invited by the Maxim Gorki Theatre, in Berlin, to develop the distinguished artist talk series ‘Kosmos²’ (2015-2017), a political intervention in the cultural discourse/ practice, in collaboration with refugee artists.

With roots in Angola, São Tomé e Príncipe and Portugal, Kilomba studied Clinical Psychology and Psychoanalysis at the ‘ISPA– Instituto Superior de Psicologia Aplicada ’ in Lisbon. There, she worked in the psychiatry department with war survivors from Angola and Mozambique. Strongly influenced by the work of Frantz Fanon, Kilomba started writing, and developing projects on memory, trauma and colonialism, extending her concerns to form, language, and performance. Recognised for her academic excellence, Kilomba received a Ph.D. fellowship from the German Heinrich Böll Foundation, and moved to Berlin, where she attained a Doctorate in Philosophy (summa cum laude) from the Freie Universitä t Berlin, in 2008. Since 2004, She has been lecturing at several international universities, and last, was a Professor at the Humboldt Universitä t Berlin, Department of Gender Studies.

Hank Willis Thomas

HANK WILLIS THOMAS is a conceptual artist working primarily with themes related to perspective, identity, commodity, media, and popular culture. His work has been exhibited throughout the United States and abroad including the International Center of Photography, New York; Guggenheim Museum Bilbao, Spain; Musée du quai Branly, Paris; Hong Kong Arts Centre, Hong Kong, and the Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art, Netherlands. Thomas’ work is included in numerous public collections including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York; Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; Brooklyn Museum, New York; High Museum of Art, Atlanta, and National Gallery of Art, Washington D.C. His collaborative projects include Question Bridge: Black Males, In Search Of The Truth (The Truth Booth), Writing on the Wall, and the artist-run initiative for art and civic engagement For Freedoms, which in 2017 was awarded the ICP Infinity Award for New Media and Online Platform. Thomas is also the recipient of the Gordon Parks Foundation Fellowship (2019), the Guggenheim Foundation Fellowship (2018), Art for Justice Grant (2018), AIMIA | AGO Photography Prize (2017), Soros Equality Fellowship (2017), and is a member of the New York City Public Design Commission. Thomas holds a B.F.A. from New York University (1998) and an M.A./M.F.A. from the California College of the Arts (2004). In 2017, he received honorary doctorates from the Maryland Institute of Art and the Institute for Doctoral Studies in the Visual Arts.